Red Hots

Six Proven Live Baits to Help You Catch More Fish

By Sport Fishing Editors

Whether you target king mackerel in a tournament series, catch snook or striped bass nearshore, or hunt tuna, bottomfish or billfish, live baits can give you a decided edge. Here are six dominant species from the Atlantic, Gulf and Pacific with tips on finding, catching, keeping, rigging and deploying them.

1 Mullet (Southeast, Gulf)

Mullet stage a near-legendary migration along the southeast Florid;! coast eveiy fall. As the Ijig schools swim down the beach in September and October, they present a moving buffet line for tarpon, snook, jacks, bluefish, sharks and other predators. But mullet can be fished in other locations for a variety of species from sailfish, kingfish and amberjack to redfish and trout.

Find: Mullet can be found throughout coastal waters almost year-round; watch for mullet to launch themselves or for their telltale head wakes.

During Florida's run, mullet are simply omnipresent along the beaches and common in the Intracoastal. Rlack (striped) mullet push through first, followed by silver (fantail) mullet, usually moving much faster.

Catch: Most anglers capture mullet with cast nets. Laws mandate maximum cast-net lengths in some areas, but a 6- to 8-foot net is all that's really needed. Use a H/a-indl mesh net for finger mullet and a fjb-inch or larger mesh for bigger bait, says Tom Greene, owner of Custom Rod & Reel in Lighthouse Point, Florida (www.antkiuereels.com). and a local fishing legend.

Keep; Mullet are fairly easy to keep in a well with even minimal circulation, but the fresher the bait, the better, Greene says, in the '60s and 70s, anglers — mast of whom fished off tlie beaches, piers and jetties — would snag mullet with a weighted treble hook then re-rig it to a single hook and east it back to the schools.

Rig/Dcpk>y: Depending on the size of the bait, Greene ties a 40- to 100-pound mono leader to his 30- to 80-pound braid main line after doubling the braid with a Bimini twist (see illustration).

He connects the doubled line to tlie leader using his own version of a no-name or Bristol knot. He runs the end of the mono into the loop in the doubled line and then wraps it four or five times over the doubled braid toward the Bimini. Fie then makes two or three wraps back toward the leader and passes the tag end through tlie loop in the doubled line so that it lies parallel to the incoming line.

Greene snells the leader to a 3/0 to 8/0 j hook, preferably one with a down-turned eye. Hook the bait toward the tail so that it swims away from the boat.

While many scenarios exist for fishing the run, if yoti fish from a boat, Greene suggests positioning the vessel ahead of tlie mullet. Cast a bait to tlie outside edge of the school to target tarpon, and free-swim a mullet beneath the school to attract snook, jacks and bluefish.

Mullet-Run Rig

DAVID SHEPHERD

30- to 80-pound braid main line

No-name

3 to 4 feet of Snelied 3/0 to 8/0 J hook 40- to 100-pound with down-turned eye mono leader

Bimini twist to form 5 to 12 inches of doubled line

50 APRIL 2 010

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Goggle Eye

2 Goggle-Eye (Southeast, Mexico)

Captains consider goggle-eyes a standard for live-baiting sailfish off southeast Florida. They're also favored in Haja, Mexico, where they're known as cabaUitos and carried by every boat heading offshore from Cabo seeking billfish. In Mexico, rigging and fishing cabs is straightforward: a hook through the back and enough weight to get them to the marlin. South Florida anglers generally dangle goggle-eyes from kites — a competitive and specialized game.

Few anglers know: the goggle-eye routine off south Florida as well as veteran captain Ray Rosher of Miss Britt Charters in Miami (www.miss britt.com).

Find: Goggle-eye gathering occurs almost exclusively at night. "We drift around anchored freighters or structure with lights," says Rosher. He concentrates on ships and structure in 30 to 100 feet of water inshore and up to 300 feet offshore.

Catch: Rosher uses sabikis he manufactures: models G16, GIB, GI10 sold by R & R Tackle (www.randrtackle .com). "A dehooker is mandatory," he says. "Do not touch the baits with your hands. If they hit the deck or bleed, we throw them back,"'

Keep: This is where a bit of alchemy comes into play. Before fishing with goggle-eyes, knowledgeable anglers keep the baits in a wire pen until they acclimate to captivity. Rasher says the gogs begin feeding within three to five days. After several weeks, they develop an extra-heavy layer of slime on their bodies, become friskier and remain far hardier. At that point they're seasoned baits. "A big pan of otir success is we use seasoned baits," says Rosher.

G t jggle-eyes need t<) have plenty of space in the well: One gallon per fish, three-fourths of" a gallon for smaller baits, is ideal, Rosher says.

52 APRIL 2010

Space proves more important than high-volume water exchange.

"We use big-volume wells and want fresh water circulation but not a huge volume, I prefer aerating my water with a bubbler or a spray."

Rig/Deploy: Rigging goggle-eyes for sailfish starts with a loop of rigging floss or a rubber band pulled through the bait's back with a rigging needle. Rtin a 5/0 to 7/0 non-offset circle hook through both ends of the floss; then twist and tuck rhe hook point between the floss and the bait's back. Rosher uses 15 feet of 50-pound Berkley Big Game Steel Blue mono for leader and fishes with 12- to 20-pound tackle off a kite.

DAVID SHEPHERD

Goggle-Eye Kite Rig

15 feet of 50-pound Berkley Big Game Steel Blue leader-.

From leader, attach 12- to 20-pound mono main line to kite rig

Hook inserted under floss or rubber-band loop rigged through back of bait

5/0 to 7/0 non-offset circle hook tied with uni-knot loop

TOURNAMENT TIP

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TOURNAMENT TIP

Bunker Menhaden Pics

3 Menhaden (Northeast, Mid-Atlantic, Southeast)

Familiar to East Coast anglers as pogies, mossbunkeror just bunker, menhaden are important forage and bait, especially for kingfish in the southern reaches of the species' range and striped bass in the north.

Find: Capt. Brant McMullan, owner of the Ocean Isle Fishing Center in Ocean Isle, North Carolina (www.oifc .com), whose team last November caught the largest king ever in the history of the Southern Kingfish Association, finds menhaden along the beach. "Diving pelicans are the telltale sign," he says.

Capt. Chris Gatley, who fishes New Jersey and New York waters (www .ardentangler.org), finds menhaden in back bays, around boat slips inside harbors and offshore. "On the ocean," he says, "you look for brown water, which is the oil and slime coming off the bunker schools."

Catch; McMullan uses a 10-foot cast net with l'/z-inch stretched mesh. 'I wouldn't use anything less," he says. C? "Higher-quality nets have more weight. The pogies go straight down, and you need to let the net sink over them."

Gatley recommends a 2-inch mesh and a 10-foot net in the backwaters. "On the ocean," he says, "you use the snatch method." Reel a leaded 10/0 treble hook through the bunker school. When you snag a bait, freeline it in place to l>e picked lip by stripers following the bunker school.

Keep: McMullan says he generally keeps one bait for every gallon of water in the well, T run a 1,000 gph pump with a 50- to 60-gallon round livewell, with the inflow turned so the bait swims into the current," he says.

Gatley runs 50-gallon wells fed by 1,500 to 2,000 gph pumps, bur he stretches the 1-galIon-one-bait title, often carrying 80 to 100 baits. "I have two 1-inch scoops on the transom that pull water into the wells with a lot of force when my boat's on plane," he says.

Rig/Deploy: McMullan rigs for kings with No. 3 to No. 5 single-strand or 30- to 60-pound braided wire and No. 4 or No. 6 Ucbles, typically spaced four inches apart, one through the nose and the other hanging or pinned In the bait.

like the braided wire," he says, "because I like the motion and can tie rigs fast with it." He fishes 20-pound main line blood-knotted to 10 feet of fluorocarbon, tied to a No. 8 or No. 10 black swivel above the wire rig.

Gatley opts for a bigger rig on stripers: "I use an Owner SSW Inline Circle, 10/0 and the Quick Rig bridle system through the nose. This keeps the hook exposed at all limes. I'll run 40- to 80-pound fluorocarbon leader when bluetlsh are around," he says.

DAVID SHEPHLRD

Menhaden Kingfish Rig

10 feet of 40-pound 2 to 3 feet of No. 4 to No. 6 Blood knot fluorocarbon No. 3 to No. 5 wire 3x treble hook

No. 3 to No. 5 wire rigged through eye of forward treble (length sized to bait)

20-pound mono main line

Black, No. 8 or No. 10 Spro barrel swivel

Note: All wire connections made with standard haywire twists. igfj; free pr embedded in body

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4 Pilchard (Southeast, Gulf)

Florida's west coast anglers consider these reliable, abundant baits as standard livewell fillers.

Find/Catch: "We find them along the beaches; Lliey get right up on tfie beach and move onto the [inshore] grass fiats in ft )iir feet of water," says Captiva-based tarpon-tournament and charter captain Ozz.ie Fischer (Rayfischer Charters; 239-872-8515). During the winter, Fischer anchors and chums the grass flats with a mix of menhaden oil and fish meal. Once he sees baits, he throws a 10-foot net with Winch stretched mesh.

As die weather warms, anglers find pilchards dimpling the surface, so they won'l need to chum. 'Ihese baits will be smaller, though, he says, "By summer all the bigger shiners move out, and we go to a V'i-inch mesh net. By fall we're back to the '/2-inch mesh again."

Keep: Pilchards will remain frisky with clean water, plenty of room and careful handling, A 750 to 1,100 gph pump cieates the critical water exchange. "I run a 24-foot Cenaiiy with a 30-gallon round livewell that's designed for carrying pilchards," says Fischer. "It has to be round, or they don't do as well."

Fischer shies away from aeration or oxygenation systems, saying, "Too many bubbles take the slime off the baits. And oxygen makes them dry and stiff."

The biggest mistake anglers make is overcrowding the livewell. "You're

better off with fewer baits that are in better shape," lie says.

Rig/Deploy: Fischer likes pilchards at tournament time for redfish, snook and trout. Rigging is straightforward; He uses a Mustad Ultra Point live-bait hook run through the cartilage in the bait's nose.^r* What is critical, lie says, is to match the hook size — usually 4/0 or 5/0 — to the size of the bait. Anglers commonly opt for a larger hook because they have the quarry in mind, and that's a mistake.

Fischer sticks to spinning gear because it gives him lx_'tter casting ability with the generally lightweight pilchards. To his 20-pound braid main line he attaches a 30- or 40-pound Yo-Zuri Hybrid fluorocarbon leader as a basic rig for redfish and snook. When tarpon fishing with larger baits ox er the grass flats, he kicks the main line up to 65-pound braid and the leader goes to 80-pound, tied to a 6/0 hook.

Against conventional practice, Fischer hesitates to chum heavily with live pilchards. "Birds have learned to follow the boats," he says, "and they Spook the fish. I try not to chum too much. It can ¡XJ a mistake."

DAVID SHEPHERD

20-pound braid main line

Surgeon's knot /

Inshore Pilchard Rig

3/0 to 4/0 Mustad Ultra Point live-bait hook tied with clinch knot

2 to 3 feet of 30- to 40-pound Yo-Zuri hybrid fluorocarbon

Note: Snook rig shown. For tarpon, use 65-pound braid main line and 4 feet of 80-pound leader.

54 ^ www.FreeDawns.Nei ^

TOURNAMENT TIP

Gulf Mexico Hardtail

5 Blue Runner/Hardtail (Northern Gulf)

'Talk about your go-to baits: Whether you fish king mackerel tournaments, target tasty red snapper or slow-troll liveys for pelagics in the Gulf of Mexico, you'll Score with a well full of hardtails.

Find: Oil rigs and artificial reefs in 40 to 100 feet of water off the northern Gulf Coast readily hold hardtails from spring through fall. During winter, anglers must run 50 miles or more offshore to find the warmer 70-plus-degree wrater these baits prefer, says Marcus Kennedy of Mobile, Alabama, a top Southern Kingfish Association tournament pro.

Virtually every rig with proper surrounding water temperature holds 10- to "12-inch hardtails on the surface, says Capi. Tommy Pellegrin, who runs a charter boat out of Cocodrie, Louisiana (www.customchartersllc .com). "When you're tuna fishing and need what they call 'tuna crack' — those 3-, 4-, 5-inch-long ones — then I mostly look for small satellite rigs."

Those single-pipe "satellite" rigs generally occur in shallower water and hold fewer predators.

Catch: Kennedy recommends using size 14 sabiki rigs on 30- to 40-pound tackle, ^»'although he cuts his rigs so he's using no more than four hooks.

In clear water, the bait may grow finicky. If so, he switches to 10- to 15-pound spin tackle and a Gotcha lure or Crippled Herring.

Off Louisiana, Pellegrin ties on a jig head and a Sting Ray Grub for surface-feeders. He drops a No. 8 Mustad sabiki rig when fishing for the smaller Luna baiLs around satellite rigs. The first hooked hardtail stays in the water to attract more.

Keep: if hardtails must spend any time in a livewell, Kennedy uses a dehooking tool. Because of bait availability all clay long, he nomially keeps no more tlian 50 or 60 hardtails in the 50- and 80-gallon wells aboard his 36-foot Yellowfin Kwazar. If carrying other bait species, he separates them; hardtails beat up other, smaller baits.

Pellegrin also uses a dehooker and recommends rejecting any hardtails that are gill-hooked or bleeding.

Rig/Deploy: To slow-troll hardtails for kings, Kennedy uses 30-pound-test tackle, mono and a fairly standard wire leader (see illustration below). He trolls four to five baits — some on the surface, some on downriggers — just fast enough to keep the bend out of tile lines.

Pellegrin uses hardtails quite often for amber jacks and red snapper, employing 3-foot, 100-pound mono leaders, 7/0 to 8/0 hooks and 6 to

8 ounces of weight Carolina rigged. He places a rubber band in front of the lead to hold it next to the swivel and occasionally clips a bait's tail fins if it proves tOO lively.

DAVID SHEPHERD

Hardtail Rig for Kingfish

30-pound-test mono 3 to 4 feet of mainline No. 7 wire

6 to 8 inches of No. 7 wire rigged through eye of J hook

Trilene knot

Black, 5/0 Owner Aki Twist hook

Black, No. 1 4x treble hook

Note: All wire connections made with standard haywire twists.

They're Alive!

4 Pilchard (Southeast, Gulf)

Florida's west coast anglers consider these reliable, abundant baits as standard livewell fillers.

Find/Catch: "We find them along the beaches; they get right up on the beach and move onto the [inshore] grass fiats in ft )iir feet of water," says Captiva-based tarpon-tournament and charter captain Ozz.ie Fischer (Rayfischer Charters; 239-872-8515). During the winter, Fischer anchors and chums the grass flats with a mix of menhaden oil and fish meal. Once he sees baits, he throw-s a 10-foot net with Winch stretched mesh.

As die weather warms, anglers find pilchards dimpling the surface, so they worit need to chum. These baits will be smaller, though, he says, "By summer all the bigger shiners move out, and we go to a Vi-inch mesh net. By fall we're back to the '/2-inch mesh again."

Keep: Pilchards will remain frisky with clean water, plenty of room and careful handling, A 750 to 1,100 gph pump creates the critical water exchange. "I run a 24-foot Cenaiiy with a 30-gallon round livewell that's designed for carrying pilchards," says Fischer. "It has to be round, or they don't do as well."

Fischer shies away from aeration or oxygenation systems, saying, "Too many bubbles take the slime off the baits. And oxygen makes them dry and stiff."

The biggest mistake anglers make is overcrowding the livewell. "You're

Livewell Pilchard

better off with fewer baits that are in better shape," he says.

Rig/Deploy: Fischer likes pilchards at tournament time for redfish, snook and trout. Rigging is straightforward: He uses a Mustad Ultra Point live-bait hook run through the cartilage in the bait's nose.^r* What is critical, lie says, is to match the hook size — usually 4/0 or 5/0 — to the size of the bait. Anglers commonly opt for a larger hook because they have the quarry in mind, and that's a mistake.

Fischer sticks to spinning gear because it gives him lx_'tter casting ability w^ith the generally lightweight pilchards. To his 20-pound braid main line he attaches a 30- or 40-pound Yo Zuri Hybrid fluorocarbon leader as a basic rig for redfish and snook. When taipon fishing with larger baits ox er the grass flats, he kicks the main line up to 65-pound braid and the leader goes to 80-pound, tied to a 6/0 hook.

Against conventional practice, Fischer hesitates to chum heavily with live pilchards. "Birds have learned to follow the boats," he says, "and they spook the fish. I try not to chum too much. It can ¡xj a mistake."

DAVID SHEPHERD

20-pound braid main line

Surgeon's knot /

Inshore Pilchard Rig

3/0 to 4/0 Mustad Ultra Point live-bait hook tied with clinch knot

2 to 3 feet of 30- to 40-pound Yo-Zuri hybrid fluorocarbon

Note: Snook rig shown. For tarpon, use 65-pound braid main line and 4 feet of 80-pound leader.

54 ^ www.FreeDawns.Nei ^

TOURNAMENT TIP

5 Blue Runner/Hardtail (Northern Gulf)

'Talk about your go-to baits: Whether you fish king mackerel tournaments, target tasty red snapper or slow-troll liveys for pelagics in the Gulf of Mexico, you'll Score with a well full of hardtails.

Find: Oil rigs and artificial reefs in 40 to 100 feet of water off the northern Gulf Coast readily hold hardtails from spring through fall. During winter, anglers must run 50 miles or more offshore to find the warmer 70-plus-degree wrater these baits prefer, says Marcus Kennedy of Mobile, Alabama, a top Southern Kingfish Association tournament pro.

Virtually every' rig with proper surrounding water temperature holds 10- to "12-inch hardtails on the surface, says Capt. Tommy Pellegrin, who runs a charter boat out of Cocodrie, Louisiana (www.customchartersllc .com). "When you're tuna fishing and need what they call 'tuna crack' — those 3-, 4-, 5-inch-long ones — then I mostly look for small satellite rigs."

Those single-pipe "satellite" rigs generally occur in shallower water and hold fewer predators.

Catch: Kennedy recommends using size 14 sabiki rigs on 30- to 40-pound tackle. although he cuts his rigs so he's using no more than four hooks.

in clear water, the bait may grow finicky. If so, he switches to 10- to 15-pound spin tackle and a Gotcha lure or Crippled Herring.

Off Louisiana, Pellegrin ties on a jig head and a Sting Ray Grub for surface-feeders. He drops a No. 8 Mustad sabiki rig when fishing for the smaller Luna baiLS around satellite rigs. The first hooked hardtail stays in the water to attract more.

Keep: if hardtails must spend any time in a livewell, Kennedy uses a dehooking tool. Because of bait availability all clay long, he nomially keeps no more tlian 50 or 60 hardtails in the 50- and 80-gallon wells aboard his 36-foot Yellowfin Kwazar. If carrying other bait species, he separates them; hardtails beat up other, smaller baits.

Pellegrin also uses a dehooker and recommends rejecting any hardtails that are gill-hooked or bleeding.

Rig/Deploy: To slow-troll hardtails for kings, Kennedy uses 30-pound-test tackle, mono and a fairly standard wire leader (see illustration below). He trolls four to five baits — some on the surface, some on downriggers — just fast enoLigh to keep the bend out of tile lines.

Pellegrin uses hardtails quite often for amber jacks and red snapper, employing 3-foot, 100-pound mono leaders, 7/0 to 8/0 hooks and 6 to

8 ounces of weight Carolina rigged. He places a rubber band in front of the lead to hold it next to the swivel and occasionally clips a bait's tail fins if it proves tOO lively.

DAVID SHEPHERD

Hardtail Rig for Kingfish

30-pound-test mono 3 to 4 feet of mainline No. 7 wire

6 to 8 inches of No. 7 wire rigged through eye of J hook

Trilene knot

Black, 5/0 Owner Aki Twist hook

Black, No. 1 4x treble hook

Note: All wire connections made with standard haywire twists.

They're Alive!

6 Pacific Sardine (Southern California)

In Southern California, anglers usually buy rather than catch their own liveys. The hottest bait depends primarily on what's available and closest to port. Year-round, that's the Pacific sardine. Virtually all local gamesters — yellow-tail, calico bass, halibut, rockfish, dorado and several tuna species — eat sardines. Squid and anchovies also rank high, but squid are only available in commercial quantities from October to May.

Fiiid/Catcli: Commercial bait operators purse-seine schools of Pacific sardines and sell them from bait barges in nearly every SoCal harbor. So the trick here involves locating gt-xxi-quality bait and treating it properly, says Mark Wiscli from Pacific

Pacific Sardine Bottom Rig

20-yard top shot of 2/0 to 4/0 Owner Flyliner hook Back-to-back 40-pound mono tied with Palomar or Trilene knot nail or uni-knots or fluorocarbon

DAVID SHEPHERD {2}

50- to 60-pound Spectra main line

Surgeon's knot

Torpedo Sinkers Trolling

4- to 12-ounce / torpedo sinker

Pacific Sardine Fly-Line or Slow-Troll Rig

50-pound Spectra main line

Back-to-back nail or uni knots /

1/0 to 2/0 Owner ringed Mutu circle hook tied with Palomar or Triiene knot

5- to 25-foot top shot of 25- to 30-pound fluorocarbon

Edge Tackle in Huntington Reach (www.pacifieeclgeuickle.conO.

"If the sardine feels slippery and slimy, is bright-eyed, has all its scales and no red spots, that's good-quality bait," Wisch says. "When it feels dry, is missing scales and looks lx;at up, load your well very lightly and take it easy."

Average cost: $30 to $35 per scoop with a braille net, which nearly tills a 25-gallon bait tank, says Sport Fishing contributor Ron Eldridge.

Keep: Wisch, whose company also makes bait tanks, says most SoCal fin baits are reasonably hardy. In summer, however, the water warms and red tides erupt, and because those are prime months for fishing, baits don't spend much time in the commercial pens (storage in the pens toughens the baits).

Wisch advises anglers not to overload their wells, especially in summer, though the tendency may be to overbuy fx?fore heading well offshore for albacore.

Rig/Deploy: Depending on the target species, anglers fly-line (freeline), slow-troll or drop sardines to the bottom. A typical slow-troll or fly-line rig starts With 50-pound Spectra main line joined with a back-to-back nail or uni-knot to a fiuorocarbon top shot (see illustration). Cap that with a 1/0 to 2/0 ringed Owner Mum circle hook. Nose-hook the bait, or pin it side to side just behind the hard spot on its head (above the edge of the gill flap). The latter method helps keep the hook from turning back in the bait.

A typical bottom rig begins with the same main line attached to a slightly heavier mono or fiuorocarbon top shot. Wisch ties a 2-foot surgeon's loop at the end of the fltioro and then cuts it so one leg is a foot long and the other measures 3 feet. For halibut, he ties a torpedo sinker to die short line; for other species such as sea bass, he ties the sinker on the longer line. To the remaining line, lie ties a 2/0 to 4/0 Owner Flyliner j hook. Hook the sardine side to side through the nose or up through the lower and upper jaws for deeper drops.

Pinny Wise

By Pat Ford

The prickly little pinfish may be considered the "poor man's" bait, but in south Florida few prey species prove more effective. To anglers who have yet to master a cast net, the pinny's a llfesaver.

To catch pinfish, you need a block of chum, three feet of water over a grass flat and a sabiki or gold-hook rig tipped with shrimp or squid. Anchor up, chum and toss the rigs — weighted with 3/s- to '/¿-ounce sinkers — into the slick. Plan to start the day with about three-dozen baits in your livewell.

Inshore or offshore, you can drift pinfish on flat lines, suspend them with floats or bounce them along the bottom on a jiq head. Catch tarpon almost year-round at river mouths, cuts or wherever you see them rolling. Rig up with a 7/0 circle hook, SO-pound fiuorocarbon leader and a float. Tarpon usually chase pinfish to the surface and put on quite a show before actually § eating the bait. To speed up the strike, cut 5 off the pinny's dorsal fin with scissors.

Bounce a pinfish along the bottom through holes, gullies and drop-offs as well as around wrecks and markers for species such as snook, redfish, cobla and grouper. Match the jig-head weight to the water depth and current, but make sure the hook has a strong, ultra-sharp point in case a tarpon picks up the bait.

A 60-pound fluoro leader will handle most everything except a huge goliath grouper, which you probably wouldn't land anyway. Hook the pinfish through the upper jaw, and it will survive longer than if you hook both lips.

Pinfish {Lagodon rhomboides) range from as far north as Massachusetts down to the Florida Keys, throughout the Gulf of Mexico and the Yucatan and In selected subtropical regions throughout the world, according to fishbase.org, Pinfish are easy to catch, hardy and popular among predators. They may not rank as a glamour species, but they make a great addition to any angler's arsenal.

About the Author: Pat Ford is a retired Miami trial lawyer who spends most of his time traveling to exotic wafers to capture his love of fishing through a camera lens. See his work at www.patfordphotos.com.

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Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Hunting Mastery Selected Tips

Deer hunting is an interesting thing that reminds you of those golden old ages of 19th centuries, where a handsome hunk well equipped with all hunting material rides on horse searching for his target animal either for the purpose of displaying his masculine powers or for enticing and wooing his lady love.

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