Boating Safety Is No Accident

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Before you head out to enjoy a day on the water, follow these simple steps to keep you, and your crew, safe:

When you are out on the water enjoying the fishing, always remember to:

Check the marine weather report and make sure you understand what conditions you are likely to experience.

Check to make sure your battery is not flat and that you have enough fuel for your entire journey.

Be aware of other boaters, environmental changes and structures in the water as we don't want you to be our catch of the day.

Make sure there is a PFD Type 1 for everyone on board and that you're carrying the right safety equipment.

Communicat

In case of emergency make sure you communicate in some way - a phone call, a radio mayday or even igniting a flare.

^ Stay with your boat:

If something does go wrong, remember to stay with your boat - it will be easier to spot by emergency services.

In case of emergency make sure you communicate in some way - a phone call, a radio mayday or even igniting a flare.

If something does go wrong, remember to stay with your boat - it will be easier to spot by emergency services.

For your free 'I've gone boating' fridge magnet and further safety information, contact Marine Safety Victoria on 1800 223 022 or visit www.marinesafety.vic.gov.au

The Place lb Be

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VICTORIA'S MARINE NATIONAL PARKS AND MARINE SANCTUARIES

Port Phillip Heads MNP

fr-V Dlscoveiy Bay MNP

Tvrelve 3 Apostles MNP

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Port Phillip Heads MNP

Addis 10

7 Point Cooke

8 Jawbone

9 Ricketts Point

10 Mushroom Roof

11 Bowara Reef

7 Point Cooke

8 Jawbone

9 Ricketts Point

10 Mushroom Roof

11 Bowara Reef

Marine National Parks and Marine Sanctuaries protect representative samples of Victoria's unique and diverse marine environments for the benefit of present and future generations.

Marine National Parks and Marine Sanctuaries protect representative samples of Victoria's unique and diverse marine environments for the benefit of present and future generations.

All forms of commercial and recreational fishing from sea or shore are prohibited, including collecting bait, line fishing, setting traps, netting and the use of spears. Heavy penalties apply.

BOUNDARY MARKERS

Shoreline Boundary Marker - points in towards park.

Inwater Special Mark - at sea boundary and protected waters only.

Parknotes which contain detailed maps of boundaries are available from Parks Victoria and DPI Fisheries Offices, from Parkweb (www.parkweb.vic.gov.au), or by calling Parks Victoria on 13 1963.

Shoreline Boundary Marker - points in towards park.

Inwater Special Mark - at sea boundary and protected waters only.

ONLY DEAL WITH AN APPROVED BIA MEMBER

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LOOK FOR THE ^^JL AT YOUR LOCAL BOATING AND FISHING BUSINESS

WHAT IS THE BIA?

The Boating Industry Association of Victoria (BIA) is a non-profit organisation which represents over 90% of the recreational boating industry around Victoria.

The principle aim of the BIA is to promote recreational boating as a safe, environmentally responsible pastime for families and individuals. BIA members are qualified and knowledgeable in their field, providing boating consumers with a high level of service and advice.

WHY DEAL WITH A BIA MEMBER?

BIA Members cover all areas of the recreational marine industry from boating, fishing, sailing, watersports, diving, accessories, services, education and training. All members are obliged to honour the BIA's Code of Practice. This charter offers peace of mind when purchasing boating and fishing products and services.

MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL BOAT & LIFESTYLE SHOW 30 January - 01 February 2009 Docklands

BIA MELBOURNE BOAT SHOW 02 - 06 July 2009 Melbourne Exhibition Centre

FOR A DIRECTORY OF BIA MEMBERS AND EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT RECREATIONAL BOATING IN VICTORIA VISIT

www.biavic.com.au

Boating Industry Association of Victoria tel: 03 8696 5600 fax: 03 9686 5334

Marine aquaculture has been established in Port Phillip Bay and Western Port for around 30 years.

Aquaculture is undertaken within individual aquaculture farming sites (Crown leases), ranging from 3ha to 27ha located within nine Aquaculture Fisheries Reserves (AFRs). Aquaculture Fisheries Reserves are clearly identified with yellow special marks (piles or buoys) with "AQUACULTURE" inscribed in black lettering on the X top mark and yellow synchronised lights placed at the external boundaries (see above).

Crown leases within AFRs are not accessible to the general public and lease holders install orange floats to mark the boundaries (see below).

For further information and a copy of the Code of Conduct, visit www.dpi.vic.gov.au/aquareserves or contact the DPI Customer Service Centre on 136 186.

INTERTIDAL RESTRICTIONS

For the purpose of fisheries regulations, the intertidal zone of marine and estuarine waters is defined as the strip of land from the high-tide mark to where the water is at least 2 metres deep at any given time.

High tide mark

2 metres

Low tide level

High tide mark

2 metres

The intertidal zone is an important link in marine ecosystems. All organisms, both plant and animal, form part of the food chain. Plants provide habitat and food for a variety of species including fish. Empty shells provide habitat for animals. Removal of any invertebrate animals from this zone may seem harmless, but it represents a loss of food for other species, and is therefore restricted or prohibited in some areas.

Intertidal Protected Areas

Victorian Waters other than Port Phillip Bay

There is a ban on the taking of some molluscs (shellfish) from the intertidal zone of all Victorian waters other than Port Phillip Bay.

Molluscs exempted from this prohibition include bivalves - such as pipis, mussels, oysters and squirter - squid, octopus, cuttlefish and dead shells. Other non mollusc species such as shrimp (all species incl. Bass yabbies), sand fleas, crab, sandworm and rock lobster may also be taken by approved methods only (see page 24). Size and catch limits may apply to some species (see pages 53-62).

Port Phillip Bay

From the intertidal zone you may collect only marine worms, Bass yabbies and dead shells by hand or with an approved hand-held bait pump only. Catch limits apply to marine worms (see page 62) and Bass yabbies (see page 53). All other invertebrates (animals without a backbone) are protected.

Marine National Parks/ Marine Sanctuaries

Intertidal collecting is not allowed in any Marine National Park or Marine Sanctuary. Restrictions may also apply in some areas of other parks.

You may not use shovels, scoops, forks, rakes or any other digging implement in any Victorian intertidal zone. You may use a fishing line, speargun or hand-held spear to catch fish, squid, cuttlefish and octopus. Where collection in intertidal habitats is permitted, the following methods are allowed:

  • an approved hand-held bait pump where the barrel does not exceed 8.5cm in diameter. A sieve may be used only in conjunction with the pump;
  • by hand or feet;
  • use of a hand-held spear or speargun, recreational hoop nets, bait traps or recreational bait nets, (specified waters apply);

FRESHWATER RESTRICTIONS

Seven Creeks: You must not take fish, use or possess fishing equipment in the waters or within 20m of the banks of Seven Creeks between the retaining wall of Polly McQuinns Dam and the Gall Gap road bridge which crosses Seven Creeks.

Goulburn River: You must not use or possess fishing equipment in the waters or within 20m of the banks of the Goulburn River from the walkway over the Eildon Pondage Weir release gates, to the fishing boundary posts 200m downstream from that point. Ryans Creek: You must not take fish or be in possession of fishing equipment on or within 20 metres of Ryans Creek between Loombah Weir and McCallsay Weir, and including Loombah Weir.

Domestic Water Storages: Many water storages are closed to the public for any form of fishing. Fishers must check with the relevant authority prior to entering these areas.

SCALLOPS - PORT PHILLIP RESTRICTIONS

No scallops may be taken from the area bounded by a straight line from St Leonards Pier to West Channel Pile then east to the point 38° 122' south; 144° 50' east and then north to the point 38° 9' south, 144° 50' east and then west to the shore at Indented Head. Intertidal restrictions also apply (see page 23).

Please note: It is an offence to release live bait in a water other than where it was initially caught. The use of live bait in waters other than where they were collected can lead to the accidental release of undesirable fish species and/or the spread of disease.

Berley

Berley is any plant or animal tissue or extract that is placed in the water for the purpose of attracting fish. Berley must not be used to attract fish for any purposes other than as part of a fishing operation. You must not use more than 10 litres of berley to assist in the taking of shark.

Mammal Blood or Offal

The use of mammal blood or offal in Victorian waters to attract any species of fish is prohibited. This does not apply to berley pellets that contain mammal blood or offal.

Bait Restrictions

Undersize fish: You must not use undersize fish as bait in Victorian waters. Noxious fish: You must not use live noxious fish (including carp and goldfish) as bait in Victorian waters.

Trout and salmon ova: You must not use trout and/or salmon ova as bait or berley to take any species of fish in Victorian waters. Frogs: Frogs' eggs, tadpoles and frogs - dead or alive - are protected wildlife under the Wildlife Act 1975 and must not be used as bait in Victorian waters.

Protected fish

You must not use as bait, any fish protected under the Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988, unless an authorisation has been made under that Act (see page 30).

MEASURING YOUR CATCH Measuring

The legal size of fish must be checked at the first available opportunity. Undersize fish must be released immediately.

Slimy Scales Fish

Scale fish

Measure fish from tip of snout with mouth closed, to tip of tail.

Abalone

Abalone must be measured prior to removal from its original location. Abalone must be measured at the widest part of the shell, regardless of whether the shell is whole or damaged.

Spiny freshwater crayfish

Spiny freshwater crayfish are measured from the rear of the eye socket to the nearest part of the rear edge of the carapace (main body shell).

Rock lobster

Rock lobster is measured from the front edge of the groove between the large antennae to the nearest part of the rear edge of the carapace (main body shell). Divers are required to measure rock lobster underwater prior to bringing them to the surface.

Shark

Measure shark from the rear most gill slit to the base of the tail fin. Measurement can be made on any side of the body.

Shark

Measure shark from the rear most gill slit to the base of the tail fin. Measurement can be made on any side of the body.

CLEANING/FILLETING YOUR FISH

Landing in Carcass Form

Catches of certain fish species must be retained either whole or in carcass form until they have been brought ashore. This is to ensure that size and/or catch limits for key species are adhered to. Refer to the particular fish in the section, Limits and Closed Seasons, on pages 32-62.

Definition of Carcass

Scale fish: The body of a fish which is not cut or mutilated in any manner other than to remove the gut, gills or scales.

Sharks including elephant fish: The body of a shark or elephant fish which is not cut or mutilated in any manner other than to remove the gut and head forward and clear of the rear-most gill slit.

Spiny freshwater crayfish: The body of a crayfish which is not cut in any way other than to remove one or more legs or claws, or is not mutilated in any way other than the absence of one or more legs or claws.

DEFINITIONS

Catch limit: A general term used to describe any limit on catching or possession of fish. Bag limits and possession limits are types of catch limits. Bag limit: The maximum number of a particular type of fish that a person may take on any one day. Possession limit: The maximum number of a particular type of fish that a person may possess at any time while in, on or next to Victorian waters. However, for abalone, a person must not possess more than one day's catch anywhere in Victoria. Scale fish: Species of fish with fins other than sharks, skates and rays. Seasons: A 'closed season' for a particular species is a period during which you must not take, attempt to take or possess that species. Species for which there is a closed season may be fished only during their open season. Fish caught accidentally during the closed season must be released immediately with as little harm as possible. Lake and river boundaries: For the purposes of regulations, the boundary between a lake and a river is the point at which the flowing water of the river meets the backed-up waters of the lake, regardless of the water level of the lake. Inland waters and marine waters: For a definition, please refer to the Fisheries Act 1995. Keeper hook: An assembly of two hooks arranged to secure one bait in one position at the end of a line. The assembly has one hook attached to the end of the line and one hook capable of sliding down the same line and touching the attached hook when unbaited. Baitjig: Up to 6 unbaited lures with hooks less than 2cm in length, attached to a line with a total rig length of up to 3m.

Handling Fish

Treating fish humanely, maintaining table fish quality and avoiding waste means:

  • using only tackle that is appropriate for the size and type of fish;
  • attending gear to ensure that fish are retrieved as soon as they are caught;
  • dispatching fish immediately, and;
  • icing fish and storing them away from sunlight, preferably in a moist bag or cooler.

Extract reproduced courtesy of Recfish Australia - National Code of Conduct www.recfish.com.au

Handling Fish to be Released

You are obliged to immediately return to the water any fish that you do not intend to keep. Unwanted fish must be returned to the water with the least possible injury or damage. This does not apply to:

  • fish declared to be noxious, and
  • live bait fish.

While toadfish, rays and native seastars are not desired species to keep, they must be returned to the water unharmed. The fish's body has a slimy protective coating, which can be damaged by excessive handling. Incorrect handling damages fish and reduces their chances of survival after release.

Hook Removal

If a fish is to be released, if possible, the hook should be removed while the fish is still in the water. Removal of the hook is a matter of judgement in relation to the potential damage that may be caused to the fish:

  • if the fish is hooked in the jaw or mouth, remove the hook as cleanly as possible using a hook remover or long-nosed pliers;
  • if the fish is hooked deeper in the mouth or in the stomach through having swallowed the bait, do not try to pull or twist the hook out. Leave the hook where it is and cut the line near the hook.

Reducing Damage to Fish

If the fish that is to be released must be handled out of water, reduce damage to the fish by:

  • using a net without knotted mesh;
  • retrieving fish as quickly as possible;
  • using wet hands or a wet cloth, and a minimum of handling to ensure that released fish have a good chance of survival;
  • wetting any surface on which you place the fish, and avoiding hot dry surfaces, and;
  • prior to release, hold the fish gently and move it forward to force water through its gills until it has revived and is able to swim normally.

Marking and Stocking Fish

You must not tag, brand, mark, fin-clip (other than as required by the fishing regulations) or stock any fish in Victorian waters without prior written permission from the Department of Primary Industries.

Tagged Fish

Research agencies and recreational fishers tag and release fish to learn more about their growth and movement. If you catch a tagged fish, record the date and location of the capture, the fish's fork length and the tag number. If you intend to keep the fish then retain the tag, some scales and, if possible, freeze the fish frame. If the tag does not display a phone number, report your capture on 1800 652 598 or VICTAG on 1800 677 620.

The Flora and Fauna Guarantee Act 1988 (FFG) allows for the listing of threatened species. FFG listed fish are also protected under the Fisheries Act 1995 and may not be taken without authorisation under these Acts. White sharks, pipefish, seadragons and seahorses are fully protected by the Fisheries Act 1995 and must not be taken. Recreational fishing for some of the FFG listed species, such as Murray cod, has been authorised for recreational anglers. With reference to the regulations in this guide, the following protected fish may be taken:

  • flat-headed galaxias (see page 43)
  • flathead gudgeon (see page 41)
  • freshwater catfish (see page 41)
  • Macquarie perch (see page 43)
  • Murray cod (see page 43)
  • Murray spiny crayfish (see page 56)
  • silver perch (see page 44)
  • southern bluefin tuna (see page 37)

All other FFG-listed fish are fully protected and must not be taken including for use as bait.

For a full and current list, call 136 186 or visit www.dse.vic.gov.au

Other Protected Species

Species protected under the Wildlife Act 1975, such as all native frogs and turtles, must not be taken for any reason without a licence or permit issued under that Act.

DEPARTMENT OF PRIMARY INDUSTRIES

Stocking fish to improve your chances t

Fisheries Victoria stocks over one million fish annually into selected lakes, impoundments and rivers to improve recreational fishing.

These fish are introduced species such as rainbow trout, brown trout and Chinook salmon, and native species such as golden perch, Murray cod, and silver perch.

BtaCTfl For more information about when and where these fish were stocked go to: www.dpi.vic.gov.au/fishing or Hie place ib Be call the Department of Primary Industries Customer Service Centre on 136 186.

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