Artillery

This knot is made in medium- and large-diameter rope and was formerly used by artillerymen to pull cannon and other artillery. It is also used by climbers, but in this case the loop must be large enough to slip over the shoulder, leaving the hands free for the climb. Form a large loop with the end under the standing part and pass the end up over the standing part to the left of the loop. Take the end of the loop with the right hand and twist it counterclockwise to form another loop 1 . Turn...

Running knots

Hangmans Knot

Running knots, also known as slip knots or nooses, are used in various situations, such as tying parcels or making traps and snares. Primitive man used running knots to make weapons and traps for capturing animals so we can deduce that they are among the oldest known to man. These knots are divided into two groups, those formed by passing a bight through a fixed loop made at the end of the rope and those made with a closed bight knotted at the end or along the rope. The main feature of running...

Knotor Surgeons Knot Bend

When making sutures in a wound, surgeons use various knots such as the carrick bend, the reef knot, and the suture knot, which has become known as the surgeon's knot. It was discovered about half a century ago and seems to be the most suitable for the purpose. The surgeon's knot has an excellent grip and is flatter and less bulky than the other knots, which tended to produce visible and disfiguring scars. The surgeon's knot is a variation of the reef knot made by increasing the number of turns...

Noose

This is a simple knot which is rarely used at sea, although it is often used on land by campers and hunters to snare birds and small game. The noose is also used to put tackle cables under stress. It is made in small-diameter rope such as string and horsehair. Make a loop at the end of a rope, then take a turn with the end around the standing part to form a loop 1 . Make an overhand knot in it with the end 2 and tighten the knot by pulling the end 3 .

Running Bowline

Running Bowline

The running bowline is mainly used for hanging objects with ropes of different diameters. The weight of the object determines the tension necessary for the knot to grip. It was used by poachers during the last century but also has many other uses for it is strong and secure, does not weaken the rope, slides easily, and undoes just as simply. The running bowline is probably the only running knot used by sailors, who use it on the running rigging or to fish out floating objects that have fallen...

Simple

Fishing Knots Illustrated

A single whip with one pulley 1 does not reduce the effort required to lift a weight. A runner 2 divides in half the effort necessary to move a weight. Tackle with a double whip has the rope passing through two blocks, one standing and the other moving 3,4 . Rigged as here, it also reduces the effort to a half. This tackle is used on the boom sheet carriages of small sailing boats, by builders for hoisting concrete buckets or small loads, and to secure loads on roof racks. The arrangement...

Cordage

Frayed Mooring Rope

Rope was one of man's first inventions, certainly predating the wheel, and its structure has remained essentially the same for centuries, although the advent of synthetic fibers has given it a strength comparable, and in certain ways superior, to that of steel. Rope and knot are two words that go hand in hand, for one is useless without the other what use is a length of rope without at least one knot in it Up to a few decades ago, the choice of rope was limited hemp and manilla were used for...

Bowline On A Bight

Bowline Fishing Knot

Knots made into the end of a rope by folding it back into a loop or an eye and knotting it to its own standing part so that it is fixed and does not slide are called loops. Unlike hitches, which are made directly onto an object and follow its shape, loops are made in the hand and are dropped over the object. These knots are indispensible to sailors, particularly the bowline which is used in many different situations. The main loops are the bowline, the bowline on a bight, the jury mast knot,...

Sheet Bend

Triple Sheet Bend Knot

Depending on the use to which it is going to be put, this knot has various names the sheet bend when it is used to tie the sheets to the cringles on the ends of square sails and the flag bend when it is used to join the two corners of a flag to the rope used for hoisting or lowering it. This knot is one of the few good for uniting two ropes of different diameters and types. The sheet bend also has the interesting property that the greater the strain put on the ropes, the better the jamming...

Poldo Tackle

This is universal and can be used at sea and in climbing and camping. Poldo tackle is a truly ingenious device thanks to the fact that it runs on a closed loop, it is self-locking. Make a bowline at one end of a rope. Run the other end through the loop of the bowline then tie the end on itself with another bowline. The photographs 1, 2, 3 show the minimum and maximum extensions of the knot. N.B. Man-made ropes should not be used forthis knot by climbers.

Stopper knots

Franciscan Knot

As their name suggests, stoppers are knots made in the end of a rope to prevent its slipping through an eye or other aperture when the rope is being used. They are also used to bind the strands of a rope. Stopper knots are used at sea at the ends of the running rigging and to weight heaving lines, as well as in climbing, camping, and fishing. These knots can also be used decoratively, though in this case they may be made in the central part of the rope as well as at the end. The most important...

Japanese Bend Knot

Japanese Bend Knots

Bends are used for joining two ropes at the ends to form a longer rope. These knots are divided into two groups those made in string and small stuff which do not need to be untied after use for example, the weaver's knot and those which are to be untied after use. For bends to be secure, the ropes joined have to be of the same diameter and have the same properties. Also note that a wet rope is stronger than a dry one. The sheet bend is an exception to the above rule as it is extraordinarily...

Hitches

Highwaymans Hitch

H itches are used for tying a rope to another object. Whenever you have to tie one, it is advisable to have a look at the rope and follow its lay. These knots are often used by sailors for mooring, fastening, and lashing so they must be able to withstand parallel traction without slipping. Hitches divide into two categories crossing knots which include the clove hitch, the cow hitch, and the bill hitch, and knots formed with simple turns, such as the fisherman's bend, the rolling hitch, and the...