Li

IWith the hook fixed in the vise, run the tying thread down the shank in touching turns. Stop at a point just opposite the barb and catch in a small bunch of clear Antron as a shuck. 2 Take a strand of amber Antron and divide it, lengthwise, in two. Catch one half above and one half below the hook shank. Cover the waste ends with a few wraps of thread. 3 Offer a pinch of ginger fur and amber Antron up to the tying thread. Dub the blend onto the thread with a finger-and-thumb twist and wind it...

Info

Ice Fishing Flies

IOnce the hook is fixed in the vise, run the tying thread on at the eye and carry it almost halfway along the shank. Take a short length of olive, ultra-fine vernille. 2 Remove the flue to expose a small amount of the core. This will represent the breathing filaments of the midge. Secure the vernille in position with thread wraps. 3 With the detached body in place, take approximately 1 inch (2.5cm) of white polypropylene yarn. Catch it in so that the yarn lies over the body. 4 Take two strands...

Mickey Finn

This gaudy hairwing is a great attractor fly. The combination of red and yellow bucktail in the wing can often tempt fish that have shunned more somber-colored flies. Various types of silver tinsel can be used for the body of the Mickey Finn, but in this case Mylar tubing is the chosen material. It is very tough, and, being plastic, doesn't tarnish. Mylar tubing also has an attractive scale pattern formed by the weave of the strands, and works well for both attractor patterns and those designed...

Caddis Fly Introduction

There is something almost magical about catching a fish on an artificial fly. Casting to a trout that has been spotted feeding, seeing the fly drift gently into its path, then watching it being sipped down as if it were a real insect, produces a mixture of anticipation and excitement that never dulls. The only thing that could possibly make the thrill even better is if you had created the fly yourself. Although it is possible to buy any number of effective fly patterns, the ability to tie flies...

Materials

Whereas the tools are the hardware of the fly-tying craft, the materials are what actually create the fly. You will find them in a mind-boggling range of colors and forms, from natural materials, such as hair, feather, and wool, to synthetics, including nylon, polypropylene, and Antron, to name but a few. As modern fly-tyers become more inventive, the list continues to grow. In fact, it is now so large and comprehensive that it would be impossible to list everything available without dedicating...

Garry

Tied on small sized hooks, from a 6 down to a 10, the Garry is a Atlantic 9reat f r summer salmon, as the river clears after a summer salmon spate. Tied large, either on a longshanked double hook, as a tube fly, or on a Waddington shank, it is also extremely effective both in the spring and the fall when the river is running high and slightly colored. Its wing is constructed from dyed yellow hair with a few fibers of dyed red hair underneath a striking combination that contrasts well with the...

Diawl Bach

Of Welsh origin, the name means, literally, Little Devil. Very quick and easy to tie, it is a great general-purpose nymph for lake fishing, where it can be used singly or as part of a team. There are now many variations on the Diawl Bach theme, some having dyed peacock herl bodies or ribs of colored holographic tinsel. This example, however, is where it all started, with the combination of a slim peacock herl body, ribbed with copper wire, and a few brown hackle fibers at the tail and throat....

Basic Techniques

There are a number of basic techniques common to the majority of fly patterns, primarily the methods used for starting and finishing a fly. Casting a fly can be tough on the materials secured around the hook, and many game fish are equipped with enough teeth to do a fly a great deal of damage when they actually take. For this reason, it is important to know how to start a fly off properly and, more importantly, how to finish it so that it stays in one piece. There is little point in going to...

Royal Wulff

Moose Mane Midge

First tied by the late Lee Wulff, the Royal Wulff is one of a series of dry flies that have a trademark V-shaped hair wing. The result is a fly that is robust and easy to tie. A bunch of bucktail or calf-tail hair is tied in so that it projects over the eye it is then divided into two wings by using figure-of-eight turns of thread. With its striking coloration, the Royal Wulff is not an imitative pattern but rather it is used to trigger the trout's inquisitiveness. It is an effective fly even...

Black Ghost

This is a very traditional style of streamer, but still very effective on both lakes and rivers. It uses paired cock hackles for the wing, placed back-to-back and tied in at the head. When using hackles in this way, it is important that they are of similar size. Check that the fibers are undamaged and then place the pairs of hackles together, dull-sides in. Hackles have a natural curve to them, and putting them together so that they curve toward one another means that they cancel each other out...

March Brown

Patridge And Brown Fly

Originally tied as an imitation of a specific species of mayfly, the March Brown has since been used as a more general and highly effective wet fly. The key to its success is the combination of hare's fur, partridge hackles, and hen pheasant wing to produce a very natural effect that works well on trout feeding on nothing in particular. When using hare's fur for a body, it is important to use both the softer underfur and the stiffer, spiky guard hairs to add a bit of life. The softer fur acts...

Stimulator

Stimulator Hook

The Stimulator is a large, high-float fly with a low-wing profile that mimics a variety of caddis and stonefly species. With a tail and wing of buoyant elk hair, it can be fished dead-drift or skated without swamping, even in fast, broken water. Positioning can be a problem when tying in elk because it is hollow and easily compressed, so tight turns of thread will cause it to flare. Tight turns are therefore only used to fix the hair in place. Once this has been achieved, looser turns are used...

Egg

The Egg Fly is tied to represent a salmon egg a source of food for many species of fish, including rainbow trout, char, and grayling. When Pacific salmon are on their reds, the number of eggs laid is simply vast, and other fish will congregate behind the spawning fish and pick off any eggs that drift downstream. The pattern is extremely simple to tie, the procedure being similar to that used for applying deer hair. First, a short, thick bunch of Glo-bug yarn is tied to the middle of the hook...

Flashback Pheasant Tail Nymph

Tying Pheasant Tails

This pattern is a variation of the classic Pheasant Tail Nymph. Its body, tail, and rib are the same as the original, but the thorax of this pattern includes a few strands of pearl Lurex laid over the peacock herl. Pearl Lurex gives a wonderful flash and sparkle to any fly, and in the case of the Flashback Pheasant Tail Nymph only a small amount of the material is used to keep the effect as subtle as possible. The aim is to suggest the sparkle caused by gases trapped within the skin of a mature...

Fly Tying Gold Head Daddy

Flat Lead Wire Fly Tying

This is more a generic style of tying than an individual pattern. Goldhead Bugs can be tied in a variety of colors, although they all have a metal gold bead at the head to give weight and a fish-attracting sparkle. Being well weighted, Goldhead Bugs are designed to fish deep, and they work well both in lakes and rivers. When using a gold bead, it is important to find a hook that will accept it. The shape of some hooks prevents the bead slipping around the bend, so it is always worth checking...

Flytyingvivafly

Viva Fly Tying

Black and green is a great color combination for early season Stillwater patterns. The Viva, named after a 1960s British car model, is a lure that combines just these colors, with a black wing and body contrasted by a fluorescent lime-green tail. To provide a dense silhouette, the body is made of chenille and capped with a generous wing of dyed black turkey marabou. The marabou not only creates the right profile, but being soft and highly mobile, it gives the pattern plenty of action. When...

Gum Beetle

Fly Tying Beetle

Microcellular foam is a wonderful material for creating beetle V5f imitations. The buoyancy of the foam means that the beetle will Brown f oat in the surface film without the need for a hackle or an trout added floatant. The foam is available in sheets of various thicknesses, the most useful for this size of fly being inch Rainbow 3mm . Colors also vary, yellow being the base for this Gum Beetle, which is a favorite Australian pattern. Black, however, is the most commonly used color because it...

Appetizer

This pattern was developed by Bob Church specifically to imitate the small baitfish found in many lakes and reservoirs. It was one of the first British patterns to incorporate marabou, which Church used to give the pattern the movement of a small fish. The Appetizer also has an overwing of gray squirrel tail, which, although dumbing down the action of the marabou, gives some control and also suggests the darker back of the fish. The tail and hackle are both a blend of gray mallard flank feather...

Soft Hackle

Tying Soft Hackle Wet Flies

This deadly little fly looks like a cross between a nymph and a simple, hackled wet fly, and it is quick and easy to tie. The key to its success is the soft, highly mobile collar hackle. The feather used for this style of fly is normally a small game-bird feather such as gray partridge. The plumage of this bird has a subtle brown and tan mottling that makes it ideal for representing the legs of a small nymph or a drowned adult insect. When tying hackles from game-bird feathers, always tie the...

Sparkle Pupa

Caddis Fly Life Cycle

A comprehensive study of the caddis fly's life cycle gave Gary LaFontaine the inspiration for this superbly designed imitation. It is tied to imitate a caddis pupa as it emerges to transpose into the winged adult. What makes it so clever is LaFontaine's use of Antron tied as a loose envelope over the main body. The result is that air trapped within the fibers produces a sparkle similar to that formed by gases within the skin of the natural. It is a pattern that works well on both rivers and...

Polar Shrimp

This brightly colored fly is a great favorite both for steelhead and the various species of Pacific salmon. The body is formed either from wool or chenille, the latter giving a more translucent effect. The white wing can be formed from either calf or polar bear hair. As when tying all hairwinged flies, care must be taken to ensure that the wing is securely locked in place. Use a strong thread that is not too thick. The more turns that can be applied to the wing base, the more likely it is to...

Parachute Hare S

Hare Hair Parachute

When trout are repeatedly rising with a gentle sipping action, this is certainly the pattern to try. Tied parachute style, this version of the ever-popular Hare's Ear is absolutely deadly when fish are feeding on insects trapped in the surface. The thing that sets parachute flies apart is the way the hackle is tied. Instead of being wound around the hook, the hackle is applied around a wing post, which sits upright at 90 degrees to the hook shank. This post can be constructed from a variety of...

Blue Charm

Fly Tying Stoats Tail

The Blue Charm is a standard Atlantic salmon fly, effective Atlantic throughout the summer months, when the river is running at its normal level. This version is tied as a simple hairwing, rather than the original that uses strips of bronze mallard edged with barred teal. Hairwing flies are now the most popular type of salmon fly Sea trout because they are easier to tie and more robust than their feather-winged equivalents. When tying floss bodies, using a double layer helps to create a...

Teeny Nymph

Pheasant Tail Wet

Developed by top American fly fisher Jim Teeny, the Teeny Nymph is a simple but deadly pattern. It is tied in a wide range of sizes and colors and is effective for most species of game fish. The body material is comprised of cock pheasant tail fibers, either plain brown or dyed a range of colors, such as black, purple, pink, orange, and olive. The Teeny Nymph is quick and easy to tie so is a great pattern for fishing rocky ground where flies are all too readily snagged and lost. Without fearing...

Stoats

Sparkling Tinsle Flytying

A jet-black dressing contrasted with a sparkling silver rib and a Atlantic bright tail of golden pheasant crest feather make the Stoat's Tail salmon mQst effectjve 0f Atlantic salmon flies. The dark Jgpl silhouette it creates works in all conditions, from the colored water of a spring flood to the crystal-dear flow of a river at ea trout summer eve Originally, real stoat's tail was used for the wing, but now dyed bucktail is preferred, or squirrel tail in the smaller sizes of hook. The floss...

Turcks Tarantula

Devised by Guy Turck, this unorthodox fly has the distinction of winning the prestigious Jackson Hole One Fly competition. It combines a number of elements, such as its low calf-tail wing and Muddler head, along with rubber legs, to produce a large, dry fly that rises big, selective trout, even on hard-fished waters. Because it has plenty of built-in action, it can be fished in a whole manner of ways, from dead drift to twitched or skated. It is tied in a range of body colors from hare's fur to...

Suspender Buzzer

Fly Tying Patterns

Plastic microcellular foam is one of the great successes of ' f modern fly-tying. Being buoyant and extremely tough, it is trout Perfect for creating a whole range of dry flies and emerger patterns. The key to using foam is judging the amount needed as little as possible, so that the fly still floats but bulk is kept to a Rainbow minimum. In this pattern, a small strip of foam is folded over to form a buoyant thorax. In this way, the Suspender Buzzer, which imitates a small, hatching midge,...

Daddy Longlegs

Longlegs Fly

The crane fly, or daddy longlegs, is a semiaquatic insect that can be found throughout the summer and fall, though it is during Brown coo er months toward the end of the year that it is most prolific. The larvae live either in bankside soil or in the damp margins of either rivers or lakes, where they feed on the roots Rainbow of vegetation. Though the adults vary in size and color, they all trout have the characteristically thin, tapered body and long, gangling legs. These legs are a major...

Goddard Caddis

Goddard Caddis

This pattern was originally known as the G amp H Sedge, after its inventors, John Goddard and Cliff Henry. It uses deer hair clipped into the roof-winged profile of an adult caddis fly. The result is not only a very natural shape, but also the buoyancy of the deer hair means that the fly floats like a cork, even when being skated over the surface. The deer hair is applied in exactly the same way as it would be for a Muddler Head, the only difference being that it runs the entire length of the...

Soldier Palmer

Soldier Palmer Fly

This bright red fly is a great favorite for loch-style fishing. With its bushy, palmered hackle, it works well on the top dropper of trout a ree-fly cast. Palmering is a technique used for tying a hackle the entire length of the body. It is a method used for many traditional lake flies, where the density of hackling produces a fly Rainbow that makes plenty of disturbance in the water's surface. It is also trout used on dry flies, particularly those that need to ride high in fast, broken water....

Light Cahill

Lemon Hackle Cock

The Light Cahill is a classic U.S. pattern and, though over 100 years old, is still a highly efficient fish catcher. It imitates a whole range of pale-colored mayflies, the most striking part of the fly being its speckled lemon wings. These wings are formed from fibers of lemon wood-duck flank feather, which are tied in as a single bunch and then divided to form a V-shaped profile. When tying this style of fly, the wing is normally applied before any other material. This allows the waste ends...

Timberline Emerger

Timberline Fly Emerger

F This brilliant little pattern was designed by top U.S. angler Randal Kaufman, and is deadly when trout are taking small, emerging trail mayflies- T'ecl on a '' t wire 00 Pattem can be fished dead-drift just under the surface, and is a great fly to try when trout are rising steadily but ordinary dun imitations are being Cutthroat re used. The immature wings of the natural are imitated by using two grizzle hackle points tied short, while a slim tail of gray marabou gives the impression of the...

Thunder Creek Minnow

Thunder Creek Minnow

1 After fixing the hook in the vise, run on the tying thread at the eye and carry it down the shank to the bend. Catch in 6 inches 15cm of embossed or medium-width, oval, silver tinsel. 2 Wind the thread on in close turns to lock the waste end of the tinsel along the shank. This provides an even base for the tinsel body. Wind the tinsel in touching turns toward the eye. 3 Secure the end of the tinsel close to the eye and remove the excess. Take a bunch of white bucktail, approximately twice the...

Olive Matuka

Matuka Fly

The term Matuka originally applied to a specific New Zealand bird whose feathers were used for this style of fly. The term has since come to mean a winging style where the feathers are secured to the top of the body with turns of ribbing. The great advantage of this method is that it prevents the wing from twisting or getting caught under the bend of the hook while casting. The wing is prepared in the standard way of forming a streamer wing, using pairs of cock hackles placed back to back. Only...

Blae and Black

Blae And Black

This traditional wet-fly pattern was designed to imitate the large black midges that hatch from many lakes from spring to early summer. Its Scottish roots are betrayed by the word blae, which actually means blue and refers to the fly's blue-gray wing, formed from starling or duck primary feather. Though a variation of this pattern uses a dubbed body, the original uses floss silk. To keep the effect smooth, the floss is wound in a double layer starting a short distance from the eye. To prevent...

Czech Nymph

With the basic profile of a caseless caddis larva, the Czech Nymph is extremely effective when trout and grayling are feeding hard on the riverbed. Developed by Czech anglers, the combination of heavy hook and lead underbody ensures that the pattern sinks extremely quickly, making it ideal for fishing in deep or fast-moving water. The Czech Nymph may be tied in a range of colors, with brown and green being the most effective. The shellback consists of a thin, flexible plastic strip, a product...

Serendipity

Serendipity Sizes

The Serendipity has a buoyant thorax constructed from deer hair, which has been spun and clipped into shape, and is a very effective imitation of a midge pupa. When chironomid midge pupae transpose into adults, they must first rise to the water's surface, hanging with the back of the thorax right in the surface film. This critical stage in the insect's life is mimicked beautifully by the Serendipity. The technique used to form the thorax is the same as used for a standard Muddler head, only the...

Sparkle

No-hackle flies are designed for fishing smooth glides and other types of water where trout are suspicious of denser, hackled patterns. The Sparkle Dun is a variation on the original Compara Dun, with a tail of clear Antron replacing the natural, gray deer hair. The aim is to imitate a small mayfly emerging from its nymphal shuck, and the clear, sparkling tail does this superbly. The fly is made to float by using deer hair flared around the top of the hook in a semicircle. The hollow deer hair...

Sparkler

Sparkler Fly

Although it vaguely resembles a small baitfish, the Sparkler is tied as an out-and-out attractor. It is most effective when fished on a fast-sinking line, especially when targeting rainbow trout in lakes. During the summer months, these fish can often be found feeding a few feet down on vast clouds of tiny water fleas known as Daphnia. Though these creatures are impossible to imitate, because of their size and sheer numbers, trout are more than willing to grab a flashy pattern such as the...

Bibio Fly Tying

Bibio Fly Pattern

This is a great fly to use when fishing a gray, rolling wave. The Bibio is of Irish origin, and was initially designed for catching sea trout. It has, however, proved extremely successful for both brown and rainbow trout when fishing large lakes and dams. With a hackle running the length of the body a technique known as palmering , it is a bushy fly that, when pulled through the water, creates a fish-attracting disturbance. The density of this hackle can be altered depending on the number of...

Adams Fly Tying

Grizzle Fibers

Although now over eighty years old, the Adams is still a very modern looking fly. The combination of grizzle and brown hackles with a medium-gray body has produced a great general dry fly pattern that catches fish around the world in a wide range of water types. This makes the Adams one of the most popular trout flies in use today. This pattern uses hackle point wings along with two hackles wound together. Hackle point wings have the advantage that they are quick and easy to tie, and they don't...

Trout Fly With A Red Tail Or

Peacock Body Red Tail Fly

This is a very traditional little fly, most famous as a winter pattern for grayling. However, it is actually a very good general pattern, equally useful on rivers and lakes. Although most often used as a dry fly, it can also be tied to be fished wet, the only difference being that a softer-fiber hackle is used. An otherwise somber-hued fly, what really sets it off is the bright tag of red wool that gives the pattern its name. Tying a wool tail is not difficult the main thing to watch out for is...

CDC Emerger

Cul-de-canard is a wonderful material for tying both dry flies and emergers. The feather comes from around the preen gland of a duck, and its fibers contain many tiny filaments impregnated with the natural oil of the duck. This means that cul-de-canard floats superbly, as do the flies tied with it. The CDC Emerger imitates a small mayfly nymph at the very point of transition into the winged adult. Its looped back sits right in the surface film producing a lifelike imitation of this most...

Munro Killer

Munroe Killer Fly Tying

Many hairwinged salmon flies, particularly those tied on standard Atlantic single or double hooks, have quite short wings, often reaching salmon on y as far as qq bend. The Munro Killer breaks this rule, and has a wing at least twice the length of the hook. The result is a fly with far more action in the water, making it effective even in slower moving parts of a river. The Munro Killer also has a bicolored wing formed by overlaying yellow bucktail with black bucktail. The two colors are placed...

Daves Hopper

Tying Knots Pheasant Tail Feather

This brilliant imitation of a grasshopper was developed by ' f top American fly-tyer Dave Whitlock, who is responsible for a 'trou number of other extremely effective patterns. It is a complicated pattern to tie, but well worth the effort, as it is deadly during r , h'9h summer when trout are feeding on the natural hoppers. Cutthroat The wing is fashioned from a folded strip of turkey wing quill. To make sure that it retains its shape over many casts and fish, spray the back of the quill with a...

Bluewinged Olive

Various species of mayfly throughout the world have the name Blue-winged Olive applied to them. They range in size from medium to small, but all have the same olive-colored body and thorax and smoky blue wings. This particular pattern is a thorax-tie version, so that rather than being wound in a tight collar, the hackle is spread in open turns over the length of the thorax. This gives a more natural footprint on the water, which is improved even further by clipping away the hackle fibers...

Muddler Minnow

Muddler Minnow Fly

This is the original Don Gapen pattern that spawned, literally, thousands of flies that now carry the Muddler appellation. First designed to imitate a small bottom-dwelling fish, Muddlers are now tied as general attractor patterns and to imitate anything from caddis flies to grasshoppers. While each Muddler may differ in color and profile, all have the same basis in their construction the spinning and clipping of deer hair to create a buoyant head or body. Being hollow and easily compressed,...

Scud

Scud, shrimp, call it what you will, this pattern imitates a small crustacean found in most rich lakes and rivers. Because of its curved, thickset shape, the Scud is a great pattern for packing full of lead, and by using wraps or layers of lead foil along the shank it can be tied very heavy. This allows it to be fished successfully in deep or fast-flowing water, where a lighter pattern simply wouldn't get down to the fish feeding on the bottom. Using a curved-shank shrimp hook, the Scud has a...

Rubberlegged Hares

s The Hare's Ear Nymph already has a reputation as a deadly pattern when fishing either rivers or lakes. However, add some Brown ultra-fine rubber legs and you have a pattern that twitches and trout 3 J pulses with life as it drifts with the current. Although standard rubber-legged patterns have been around for a long time, the Cutthroat introduction of very fine rubber strands has meant that the technique can be employed with virtually any type of nymph. These strands come in various...

Clouser Minnow

Bucktail Clouser Minnow

The Clouser Minnow is an extremely effective baitfish imitation that catches a whole range of game fish in fresh- and saltwater. Brown ts a ure comes from a combination of heavy lead eyes and trout long, mobile tail and wing that give it a wonderful ducking-diving action on every twitch of the retrieve. It is also tied to Arctic take the knocks that come when catching large, powerful fish, and the use of tough materials such as bucktail, ultra-strong thread, and Super Glue ensures that the...

Cutwing Caddis

Folded Wings For Flytying

Caddis flies make up a high proportion of the trout's diet in both rivers and natural lakes. A warm summer's evening is the best time to find fish taking the freshly emerged adults as they skitter across the water's surface, and is also the most effective time to use a well-tied imitation. An adult caddis fly imitation needs to be retrieved to imitate the action of the natural, so it is important to tie it with buoyant materials that won't easily become waterlogged. The Cutwing Caddis fulfills...

Thunder Creek Silver Shiner

One of a large group of themed patterns, the Thunder Creek Silver Shiner makes a robust and effective imitation of a small baitfish. Although it looks simple, it is not that easy to tie because getting the hair the right length and keeping the two colors separate takes a reasonable level of tying skill. The Thunder Creek range was devised by American tyer Keith Fulsher to imitate a whole variety of fish species, and the Silver Shiner is one of the simplest. Once the wing has been swept back and...

Ascending Midge Pupa

Fly Midge Pupa

, The pupae of the chironomid midge make up a large part of the f Stillwater trout's diet, and the naturals are taken anywhere in the rout1 water column, from the bottom to the surface. In order to rise to the surface, where they will transpose into the adult, the pupae buoy themselves up with gas. This gas forms a silvery sheen under the pupae's skin, which in the Ascending Midge Pupa is imitated by a thin strip of pearl Lurex tied along the top of the abdomen. Unlike some midge pupa patterns,...

Deerhair

Deer Hair Fry

Although not an easy pattern to tie, if the correct techniques are mastered first, the Deer-hair Fry is well within the skill level of most tyers. The key is to come to grips with spinning deer hair. Once the basic technique for tying a Muddler has been understood, it is simply a matter of expanding the process to cover the whole of the hook shank. It is important to add hair in even bunches, and to pack each spun bunch against the previous, so that the consistency of the hair is the same from...

Black Tadpole

Tadpole Fly

In rivers, the current imparts movement to the fly on lakes, all that action must come from the retrieve and the fly itself. Turkey marabou, which is extremely soft, has been used for many years to make highly mobile wings and tails for Stillwater work. In the Tadpole, this feature is taken to its logical conclusion, with a highly mobile tail that is much longer than its body. By adding weight to the hook, the Tadpole is made to duck and dive on every twitch of the retrieve, while the long tail...

Rubberlegged Stonefly Nymph

Adhesive Lead

This imitation of a giant black stonefly nymph is heavily weighted to allow it to be fished deep in pocket water and fast runs where Brown naturals are found. The weight comes from adhesive lead foil trout that is cut into a thin strip and wound over the hook shank prior to applying the body materials. The hook itself is a specially Cutthroat designed creeper model that has a slightly bent shank to give the finished fly a swimming attitude. The body and thorax, rather than simply black, are...

Black Pennell

Black Butcher Cocks

A traditional pattern, the Black Pennell is still widely used today on both rivers and lakes. In smaller sizes it works well during a hatch of black midge, while tied large, on a size 8 hook, it is a deadly pattern for sea trout and Atlantic salmon. Though some variations call for a dubbed fur body, the original Black Pennell has a body of floss silk. The aim is to create a very slim, sparse look, so bulk must be kept to a minimum. For this reason, when tying a floss body, the two-ply yarn is...

Marabou Damsel

Tying Nylon Monofilament

Unlike the closely related dragonfly nymph, which propels itself by forcing water from its rear end, the nymph of the damselfly tr Si moves by a rapid lashing motion of its abdomen. This movement appears to act as a trigger to the fish, and for an imitation to be successful it needs to have plenty of built-in action. In the case of Rainbow the Marabou Damsel, this is achieved by using a tuft of soft trout turkey marabou for the tail, a material that really pulses with life in the water. A plain...

Balloon Caddis

Foam Caddis

Austrian angler Roman Moser devised this wonderful imitation of a caddis fly pupa at the very point of transposing into the adult. Rather than use a hackle to keep the fly floating, Roman went for a more modern approach with closed-cell foam. The foam provides the required buoyancy, but also mimics perfectly the bulge in the thorax as the adult caddis fly pulls itself from the pupal shuck. When using foam, the key is never to pull it too tight. Stretching will reduce the material's natural...

Currys Red Shrimp

Currys Red Shrimp Fly

Curry's Red Shrimp is acknowledged as the pattern from which all other Irish-style shrimp flies evolved. It is used exclusively for catching Atlantic salmon, works well in a variety of water conditions, and is especially good in small- to medium-sized spate rivers. Although extremely impressionistic as far as imitating a real shrimp is concerned, the pattern employs a mixture of feathers to add plenty of movement. Of most interest is the tail, which imitates the shrimp's whiskers and consists...

Missionary

This version of the Missionary was designed by the late Dick Shrive to act as a baitfish imitation that could be fished very I own I s owly. The way that the wing is applied is the key to the pattern's action. Rather than simply being tied in as a bunch Vj of fibers, the gray mallard flank feather is used whole. With the Rainbow fibers at the base removed, to leave a spoon-shaped feather a little longer than the body and tail combined, the prepared wing is tied on flat to the top of the hook....

Mudeye

Mudeye Fly Patterns

Mudeye is the name Australians give to the nymph of the dragonfly, a large carnivorous insect that preys on smaller aquatic invertebrates. During the summer months, dragonfly nymphs break cover and crawl out onto dry land or along a reed stem before transposing into the winged adults. Trout will pick off the naturals as they leave the sanctuary of the lake bottom, so any imitation works best when fished around weed fringes or drowned timber. To add weight and help achieve the flattened body...

Teal Blue and Silver

Teal Silver Fly

Although a traditional wet fly, this pattern has all the hallmarks of a baitfish imitation, with its dark wing and sparkling, silver body. It is a great pattern for both lakes and rivers, and in its larger sizes works very well for night fishing for sea trout. When tying flat tinsel bodies, it is important to keep them smooth. To Rainbow this end, the materials that are added first, such as the tail or rib, troul should be used to provide a flat, even base. A further trick is to use the tinsel...

Montana Nymph

' This pattern was originally designed as a simple-to-tie imitation of a variety of large, dark stonefly nymphs. It has since become trout1 widely usec as a 9enera' nymph pattern, particularly on lakes. Apart from the tail and hackle, the main component of the Montana Nymph is chenille. The original combination was black Cutthroat and yellow but, especially in the United Kingdom, fluorescent lime-green has been substituted for the latter. Like most patterns v that incorporate chenille, care...

Polywinged Midge

This little dry fly is effective and simple to tie. Tied in black it makes a great imitation of a whole host of small dark flies, from the black gnat and hawthorn fly to tiny black midges all you do is alter the size of the hook. The Polywinged Midge consists of a body of dubbed fur, a wing of polypropylene, and a collar hackle to help it float. Dubbing is a basic process for applying a fur body, and entails twisting the teased-out fur along the thread between finger and thumb. Waxing the...

Palomino Midge

Palomino Midge

Detached-bodied flies are becoming increasingly popular because they allow a small, light hook to be used. In the Palomino Midge, a very fine, tough chenille, known as vernille, is used to create the abdomen of the chironomid midge pupa. The vernille helps create an extremely natural effect by exposing a short section of the core, at the tail, the white breathing filaments are represented. The Palomino Midge is tied in a range of body colors from black and brown to olive and red. In each,...

Marabou Muddler

Marabou Muddler Fly Pattern

While this yellow and gold version of the Marabou Muddler works extremely well, the pattern can also be tied in a wide range of colors. In white and silver it makes a great imitation of a silvery bait fish, while in olive or brown it can be used to suggest anything from a leech to a small bottom-dwelling fish. In all its variations, the basic techniques and materials remain the same. Its pulsating, fish-attracting action comes from a generous wing of turkey marabou while the bulky deer hair...

Bloodworm

In lakes and slower-moving rivers, the larvae of the chironomid midge make up a large part of the trout's diet. They vary in color from pale green and brown to a bright blood red. These red larvae, known by anglers as bloodworm, live the bulk of their lives in silt tubes, but when disturbed or migrating can move by a sinuous lashing motion. This action is almost impossible to replicate, but by adding a small pinch of red marabou as a tail, enough action can be imparted to make an effective...

Silver Butcher

The Butcher Wet Fly

F amp T When this pattern was first tied it was known as the Moon Fly. Today, though, it has been renamed as part of a series of flies, Brown most 0f whjCh are based around a wing of iridescent blue trout mallard. All of the Butchers are flashy flies and used either as general attractants or, as in the case of the Silver Butcher, as a Rainbow representation of a small fish. The technique for tying the wing is similar to most paired wet-fly wings. However, in the case of the Butcher, the...

Griffiths Gnat

Length Size Hackle

Although called a gnat, this is actually a great all-purpose dry fly, V f effective either on rivers or lakes. It works best in smaller sizes trout w ere suggests all sorts of small creatures trapped in the surface film. It also makes a very good representation of small chironomid midges in a mating ball. The Griffith's Gnat is tied Arctic using only two materials peacock herl for the body and a grizzle cock hackle that is wound along its length. Interestingly, to keep weight to a minimum,...

Elk Hair Caddis

Caddis Fly Roofed Wing

Al Troth developed this superb imitation of an adult caddis fly. Rather than imitating a particular species, it uses the typical roof-wing profile to mimic a whole range of medium to small brown caddis flies. The wing is made from a small bunch of elk hock hair that has been bleached to a light tan. Elk hock is reasonably tough, but still retains some of the buoyancy found in ordinary elk hair. As when tying any hairwing, care must be taken to make the hair secure. Once the body and hackle are...

Mrs Simpson

Mrs Simpson Fly

This New Zealand pattern makes a great representation of something big and meaty found on the bottom of either rivers trout1 r 'a' lt eS 'any 'n9 rom a sma t0 a dragonfly nymph, even a crayfish, at a pinch. Because it is designed to fish deep, it is l Lj invariably tied with an underbody of lead wire, over which are Rainbow wound turns of water-absorbent chenille in various colors. The wing, however, is the most interesting part of this fly, comprising overlapping layers of rump feathers taken...

Moose Mane Humpy

Ice Fishing Wind Break

With its buoyant back and wing and dense hackle, the Humpy is a true high-float pattern designed for fishing fast, broken water. Although not tied as an imitation of any specific insect, it works as a good copy of many of the darker mayflies found on fast-flowing streams. Humpies are tied in a range of body colors. In each variation, the back and wing are tied from natural deer hair the butts of the hair being used for the back while the tips are carried forward over the eye to form the wing....

Shuttlecock

Shuttlecock Fly Pattern

This is a classic Emerger pattern in the same style as the ' bf Klinkhammer Special. However, the Shuttlecock is tied without a trout1 hackle, relying on its wing of gray cul-de-canard feather to keep it floating. The wing projects so far forward that the body n i actually sinks beneath the surface and mimics that of a Ratrou W chironomid midge pupa on the very point of transposing into the adult. Because it is imitating a relatively small insect, the Shuttlecock is most effective tied on hooks...

Gosling

The Gosling is a traditional Irish Lough pattern tied to represent the large pale mayfly Ephemera danica. Unlike many mayfly Brown imitations it is tied, not as a dry fly, but to be used wet, pulled trout j j through the wave tops. To create the bulk necessary to ensure plenty of movement in the water, the Gosling has two hackles Atlantic at the collar. The first is a dyed orange cock hackle, over which is wound a speckled gray mallard flank feather. The Gosling is usually fished on either the...

Booby Fly Tying

The buoyant eyes of the Booby allow it to be fished on the f surface, on a floating line, or deep down, near the lakebed, Brown with a fast-sinking line and a short leader. The eyes were trout originally formed from two polystyrene balls wrapped in stocking mesh. However, these balls were easily crushed and Rainbow their buoyancy diminished. Using a section of microcellular plastic foam alleviates the problem, because this type of foam is far tougher and can be fixed directly to the hook with...

Shipmans Buzzer

Dave Shipman originated this damp, dry fly designed to sit right in the surface film. The pattern is tied to imitate a hatching midge, and the white Antron breathers at either end of the body keep it floating. In order to increase surface area, the body can be roughed up a little with a piece of Velcro before a flotant is applied. Although really a Stillwater pattern, when tied on small hooks, from a size 18 down, it works well in running water, particularly on calm glides and glassy pools. The...

BiVisible

Bivisible Dry Fly

The Bi-Visible is tied entirely from hackles no other materials other than tying thread are used. The tail is a cock hackle point and the entire length of the hook is covered in close turns of hackle. Two different colors are always used, the darker at the rear followed by a distinct collar of white cock hackle just behind the eye. This combination produces the distinct bi-visible effect. Here it is tied in black and white, though a brown and white variation can also be tied. Being very bushy...

Alaskabou

Alaskabou Flies Pictures

The Alaskabou pattern is quick and easy to tie, and packed with fish-catching action. This is the purple version of a range of similarly tied patterns that are particularly effective for steelhead and the various species of Pacific salmon. The key to the pattern s action is a dense wing of dyed turkey marabou that pulses with life as it swings around in the current. The hackle, too, has plenty of mobility because it is tied from a Schlappen feather a hackle taken from below the saddle patch of...