The March Brown Wet

Forming the fly's body with dubbed tying thread; the dubbing consists of fibers of hare's-ear fur, spun onto the tying thread. (See "Dubbing" in Chapter 4.)

The dubbed body, ready to have the ribbing wound on.

Winding on the ribbing. (See Chapter 4.)

The ribbing - a double length of tying thread - about to be tied in. (See Chapter 4.)

Winding on the ribbing. (See Chapter 4.)

Winding the tying thread down the hook shank. (See "The Beginning of a Fly" in Chapter 2.)

Winding the tying thread down the hook shank. (See "The Beginning of a Fly" in Chapter 2.)

The tail - formed from a slip of hen-pheasant feather - tied on with two turns of tying thread. (See, curiously enough, "Wood-duck Tails" in Chapter 3.)

Forming the fly's body with dubbed tying thread; the dubbing consists of fibers of hare's-ear fur, spun onto the tying thread. (See "Dubbing" in Chapter 4.)

The completed hackle.

The trimmed partridge hackle secured by tying thread. The downy part of the hackle is about to be trimmed off.

The wings - formed, like the tail, from slips of pheasant feather - tied on. (See "Matched Wet Wings", Chapter 6.)

The completed hackle.

Trimming the tip of a partridge hackle, before tying (See "Soft-hackled Flies" in Chapter 5.)

The hackle has been wound on, and the surplus is about to be trimmed off.

The completed March Brown (though the head still needs lacquering), finished off with a wrap knot. (See "The Wrap Knot" in Chapter 2.)

Trimming off surplus wing material.

The trimmed partridge hackle secured by tying thread. The downy part of the hackle is about to be trimmed off.

The wings - formed, like the tail, from slips of pheasant feather - tied on. (See "Matched Wet Wings", Chapter 6.)

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