Standard Spoons

Standard spoons come in a confusing array of sizes, shapes and thicknesses. You can greatly improve your fishing success by learning which spoons work best for the fish you pursue and the situations you typically encounter.

The major concern in choosing standard spoons is thickness. Some manufacturers make the same design in thick, medium and thin models.

Thick spoons wobble best when retrieved rapidly. They can be cast long distances, even in a strong wind. These qualities make them ideai for explora- , tory fishing. When you are not sure where to find the fish, thick spoons enable you to search out a large area quickly.

A thick spoon sinks rapidly and holds its depth when retrieved. For these reasons, it is a good choice for fishing in deep water or fast cunent.

thin spoons wobble attractively at slow speeds, 50 they work well in cold water or whenever fish are sluggish and reluctant to strike. But you cannot cast a thin spoon nearly as far or as accurately as a thick one. Thin spoons sink slowly and tend to climb on the retrieve, so they are best-suited to fishing in shallow water.

Medium-thickness spoons perform best at moderate speeds. You can cast them easily. They sink fairly fast and hold their depth reasonably well. Because they work well in a wide variety of situations, they are the most popular of all spoons.

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StreakerTM, (29) Skeeter- (30) Water Demon, (31) Dar-devle Imp Klicker- (32) Pops Topwater, (33) Silver Bullet'M, (34) FinselTM, (35) Pet- (36) Sprite- (37) RattlesnakeTM, (38) Super Duper- (39) SyclopsTM, (40) Gordy G. Thick spoons include: (41) Kastmaster- (42) Swedish 01'

Wive, (43) Limpet'M, (44) Fiord, (45) Krocadile- (-) SpoonerTM, (47) k.o. Wobbler, (48) Lucky-GloTM, (49) Wob-L-Rite, (50) PixeeTM, (51) Hot Shot- (52) Hus-LureTM, (53) Tor-P-DoTM, (54) Mr. Champ- (55) Little Oeo, (56) Kamlooper, (57) Rok't-Devlet-

Hot Shot Lure

STANDARD SPOONS came in a variety of thicknesses. A (1) thin spoon 3 inches long weighs about 3/8 ounce; a

  • 2) medium spoon of the same length, about 3/4 ounce; a
  • 3) thick spoon, approximately 1 1/2 ounces.
Fishing Casting Spoon

Fishing With Standard Spoons

Fishermen use standard spoons for everything from long-distance casting off piers, to trolling in cteep water, to stationary fluttering in current. This versatility, along with the simplicity of using these lures, accounts for their widespread popularity.

Although standard spoons are easy to use, Tany anglers make mistakes which cost them fish. Common errors include tying the line direct1y to the attachment hole, failing to use a swivel, and retrieving at the wrong speed or depth.

If the spoon does not come with an attachment ring or rounded snap, you should add one. If you tie monofilament directly to the hole, the spoon will not wobble freely and the sharp edge will probably sever the line. To avoid severe line twist, a1ways use a good swivel, preferably the ball-bearing type.

It pays to carry a selection of thick, medium and thin spoons. The most productive depth and retrieve speed may change from day to day depending on variables like wind, cloud cover and mood of the fish. With a selection of spoons of different thicknesses, you can a1ter your strategy to suit the conditions.

The techniques shown on the following pages specify thick or thin spoons. But in most instances, they will a1so work with medium-thickness spoons.

Snap Swivel Easy Change Lure
CLIP a snap-swivel directly to the hole or attachment ring. When attaching thin spoons, some fishermen prefer to splice a barrel swivel into the line 6 inches to 3 feet ahead of the lure. This prevents the swivelfrom interfering with the action of the spoon.

How to Fish Thick Spoons From a Pier or Steep Shoreline

Using Spoons For Striper
CAST a thick spoon using a 7- to 9-foot, long-handled spinning rod. A two-handed cast will give you maximum distance. To locate salmon, trout and other fish that suspend, count the spoon down to different depths after each cast. Pay out line as the spoon sinks, counting until

the line goes slack. Then, reel in steadily. If the spoon hits bottom on a 10-count on the first cast, count down to 8 on the second cast, 6 on the third, etc. Remember the count on each cast; if you hook a fish, count down to the same depth on the next cast.

Other Ways (o Fish Thick Spoons

How Fish With Spoon

ANGLE your casts upstream in deep current. Hold your rod tip blgh, following the spoon as it drifts and sinks. Reel just fast enough to keep a taut line. When the spoon is directly downstream, lower your rod and retrieve with twitches to imitate a minnow struggling upstream.

RETRIEVE with sharp jerks after casting beyond a surface school of white bass, stripers or largemouths. The jerky retrieve draws strikes because the spoon acts like a shad trying to escape. Pause occasional ly to let the spoon sink; the largest fish often stay deepest.

How to Fish Thin Spoons En Current

How to Fish Thin Spoons En Current

CAST across current so the spoon alights just beyond and upstream of a boulder. Work the spoon along the upstream and near sides. Next, cast beyond and below the boulder and reel quickly into the eddy. Keep the spoon wobbling there for a few secorids, then try another spot.

POSITION yourself upstream from hard-to-reach cover like an overhanging limb or undercut bank. Cast your spoon so it alights just upstream from the cover. Let the spoon drift into the spot, then hold it in place so it flutters in the cunent.

Other Ways to Fish Thin Spoons

Spoon Lures For Pike

FAN-CAST a thin spoon over a shallow flat. Reel steadily, keeping the spoon just off bottom. This technique works well for trout and salmon near stream mouths, for lake trout along rocky shorelines after ice-out, and for northem pike in mud-bottomed bays in early spring.

RETRIEVE a thin spoon just above submerged vegetation. If you feel the spoon touching the weed tips, pull sharply to free it and to make it run shallower. Large-mouths or northem pike lurking in the weeds will leave cover to grab the spoon.

Tips for Using Standard Spoons

Replacing Treble Hooks With Single Hooks

REPLACE the treble hook with a Siwash hook if you are losing too many fish. A Siwash penetrates deeper and holds better. To make your spoon run shal1ower, substitute a treble hook dressed with bucktail.

How Make Artificial Lures

REVERSE a spoon by removing the hook from the split-ring and attaching it to the ring on the other end. The reversal changes the amount of wobble and may even change the depth at which the spoon runs.

Triple Hook Spoon Bucktail

SHINE tamished spoons by using baking soda on a damp rusted, you may have to polish it with fine steel wool. A

cloth. Or, you can use metal polish, or polishing com- shinier spoon reflects more light, making it visible to fish pound used for cars. If the spoon is badly tamished or at a greater distance.

SHINE tamished spoons by using baking soda on a damp rusted, you may have to polish it with fine steel wool. A

cloth. Or, you can use metal polish, or polishing com- shinier spoon reflects more light, making it visible to fish pound used for cars. If the spoon is badly tamished or at a greater distance.

ADD tape to yor spoon to change its appearance. Prism tape and fluorescent tape work especially well; a thin strip often makes a big difference. Or, you can color the spoon with fluorescent spray paint. Many fishermen carry small spray cans in their tack1e boxes. You may have to use a

white primer before applying the fluorescent paint. Waterproof marking pens can also be effective, but the color they produce is never as intense as paint. These techniques eliminate the need to carry dozens of different-colored spoons.

Lake Trout Lure Color Spoon

Trolling Spoons

Trolling spoons rank among the top lures for trophy salmon and lake trout. The slow, fluttering action often tempts big fish to strike at times when they ignore faster moving lures.

You can troll with any type of spoon, but trolling spoons were designed specifically for that purpose. Without added weight, a trolling spoon could be cast no more than a few feet and would plane to the surface when retrieved.

The fluttering, wide-swimming action of a trolling spoon results from the ultra-thin design. Thicker spoons have less side-to-side action at slow speeds because the force of moving water has less effect on a heavier object of the same size and shape.

Because of the ultra-thin metal, trolling spoons are less durable than other types of spoons. They often become badly bent in the process of unhooking fish. Occasiona11y, a fisherman retrieves the spoon and finds a sharp bend in it, the result of a fish grabbing the spoon but missing the hook. But you can return most trolling spoons to their original shape simply by bending them with your fingers.

The extremely light weight of a trolling spoon makes it relatively snag1ess, even when trolled over a rocky bottom. Heavier spoons sink quickly when you slow down, and often wedge between the rocks. Trolling spoons sink much more slowly. If they do touch bottom, they seldom wedge in place. Their resistance to snagging makes them a good choice for bottom-hugging fish like lake trout.

Trolling Spoons Are Thinner
TROLLING SPOONS are thinner than any other type af spoon. A typical 3-inch trolling spoon weighs about 1/8 ounce, but some ultra-thin models of the samelength weigh as little as 1/16 ounce. Many trolling spoons come with large Siwash hooks rather than treble hooks.
Spinning Types Spoons

TROLLING SPOONS include: (l) Kokanee KingTM, (2) Needle Fish@, (3) TeaserTM, (4) Red Ma^c, (5) Canaman Wonder~\ (6) Alpena DiamondTM, (7) McMabon@, (8) Candlefish, (9) Scalelite@ WobbIer, (l0) Salmon SeekerTM, (ll) Looter, (l2) Pt. DefianceTM, (l3) CohoJoe, (l4) Salmon Doctor@, (l5) Sutton@ 3l, (l6) ManisteeTM,

(l7) Cobo Flasher, (l8) Tot Mack@, (l9) Sutton@ 88Hr, (20) Fin Weaver, (2l) Salrnon Slammer, (22) Evil EyeTM, (23) HooksterTM, (24) Coho-Laker Taker, (25) FlutterLite TM, (26) Flutter Spoon TM, (27) King Fish, (28) Andy Reeker@, (29) Junior Flutterdevle@, (30) Northport Nailer, (3l) ApexTM, (32) L.G. Johnson@,(33)Superior@.

Fishing With Trolling Spoons

While trolling spoons have a special appeai to lake trout and salmon, they will also catch lake-dwelling rainbow and brown trout. Some fishermen use trolling spoons to search for striped bass in sprawling southem reservoirs.

You can troll these spoons without added weight when fish are near the surface. But you will need sinkers or some type of deep-trolling device when fish are deeper. Most anglers prefer downriggers so they can precisely control the depth. But many troll with wire or lead-core line, or use diving planes.

With these lures, trolling speed is critical. Some fishermen tie a pilot lure (page 69) to their boat to monitor their speed. But a trolling-speed indicator (page 68) will give you a precise reading and is easier to use. Run the spoon alongside the boat to determine the proper speed, then continue at that speed once you start fishing.

An erratic trolling path genera11y works better than a straight one. If you troll in an S-pattem, the spoon will slow down and drop as you begin to turn, speed up and climb as you straighten out, then slow and drop again as you turn the other way. The change of speed, depth, and direction often triggers a strike.

Trolling spoons wobble best when fished with light, limp line. Stiff line restricts the action more than it would with a thicker spoon.

Wire Line Trolling Lake Trout

WIRE-LINING with trol1ing spoons works well for deepwater fish like lake trout. Wire has little water resistance and does not stretch, so you can easily reach bottom and feel strikes. To tie a wire-line rig (inset) attach a

5-foot leader of 1O-pound Tono to one eye of a 3-way swivel. Tie a 10- to 16-0unce lead ball to another eye with 2 feet of 15-pound Tono. Attach 20- to 30-pound wire line to the third eye with a haywire twist (page 14).

WIRE-LINING with trol1ing spoons works well for deepwater fish like lake trout. Wire has little water resistance and does not stretch, so you can easily reach bottom and feel strikes. To tie a wire-line rig (inset) attach a

5-foot leader of 1O-pound Tono to one eye of a 3-way swivel. Tie a 10- to 16-0unce lead ball to another eye with 2 feet of 15-pound Tono. Attach 20- to 30-pound wire line to the third eye with a haywire twist (page 14).

How to Stack Trolling Spoons on a Downrigger Cable

Downrigger Technique
LET OUT about 50 feet of line, make a loop with at least six twists, then attach the loop to a release above the cannonball. Keep a sliding release (arrow) clipped to the downrigger arm, then lower the cannonball lO to l5 feet.
Downrigger Stacking Clips

CLIP the sliding release to the downrigger cable after letting out the second line and attaching it to the sliding release. Do not attempt to stack a heavy trolling spoon on top of a light one.

Trooling Spoon Lure

LOWER the cannonball to the desired depth with both reels in free-spool and the clickers on. Reel up as Tucb slack as possible. Slack line increases the chances of a fish throwing the hook after it strikes.

How to Bend a Trolling Spoon to Improve Its Action

BEND a spoon by putting your thumbs together at its center, then sliding them outward while exerting pressure. The bend should be as smooth as possible. Becareful not to kink the spoon.
Spoons Bent

ACTION of a normal spoon (top) differs greatly from that of a bent spoon (bottom). The bent spoon catches more water, causing it to veer more sharply to the side and creating a wider wobble.

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