Angler

A basic guide for the beginning angler Your angler dollars help clean up rivers and streams, restore fish populations, and create public access to waterways. Every purchase of fishing tackle carries a tax that goes from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to state fish and wildlife agencies for fisheries research, habitat improvement, aquatic resource education programs and fishing and boating access. Texas Parks and Wildlife receives federal financial assistance from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

Snelled Knot

Pond Shrimp Fishing

Makes a strong connection when fishing with bait and using a separate length of leader 1. Thread the line through hook eye about 6 inches. 2. Hold line against hook shank and form a circle. 3. Make 5 or 6 wraps through loop and around line and shank. 4. Close the knot by pulling on tag end of the line. Tighten by pulling on main line in one direction and the hook in the other. Always check current fishing regulations see page 46 to make sure your choice of bait is legal. These are excellent...

Flies and Poppers

Almost all common sport fish will strike a fly or popper of some variety Flies and poppers are small, very light, almost weightless lures used primarily for flyfishing. A spincast or spinning rod and reel outfitted with a bubble clear bobber placed four to five feet above the lure works well if you don't have a fly rod. These lures are excellent for sunfish and bass, but most any fish can be caught on these baits. Junior and Master A J L E R Guidebook Channel Catfish, Ictalurus punctatus Other...

Fly rod casting

Casting Angeln

Casting with a fly rod and reel is different than casting a lure or heavy bait. With spincasting, spinning and baitcasting, the weight of the bait or lure and any added weight pulls the line behind it to the target. Fly lures are light and have little weight and you cast the line to bring the lure to the fish. Lay your rod down and measure out 20 to 25 feet of line from the tip of the rod. Do not have a fly tied on for practice tie on a piece of bright colored yarn. 1. Grasp the rod as though...

Simplified Blood Knot

Mostly used to join two lines together of about the same diameter. 1. Take the two lines' ends and tie an overhand knot this knot will be clipped off later . 2. Tighten to combine the two lines into one. 3. Form a loop where the two lines meet, with the overhand knot in the loop. 4. Pull one side of the loop down and begin taking turns with it around the standing line. Keep point where turns are made open so turns gather equally on each side. 5. After eight to ten turns, reach through center...

Double Surgeons Loop

Quick, easy way to tie a loop in the end of a leader often used as part of a leader because it's relatively strong. 1. Double the end of line to form a loop and tie an overhand knot at the base of double line. 2. Leave the loop open in the knot and bring the double line through again. 3. Hold the main line and tag end and pull the loop to tighten the knot. The size of the loop can be determined by pulling the loose knot to the desired point, and holding it while the knot is tightened.

Texas Farm Ponds

They vary widely in size, water quality and the habitats they offer aquatic life. Most are less than an acre in size, but even these small ponds can be home to sport fish like largemouth bass, sunfish and catfish. Good fishing requires good pond management. Careful stocking and proper harvest help maintain the balance of predatory fish and their prey. Control of aquatic plants keeps a balance between shelter and open water. For more information about pond...

Spincasting and Baitcasting Rods

Casting rods have spincast or baitcast reels and line guides PISTOL GRIP OR STRAIGHT HANDLE LINE GUIDES ON TOP mounted on top. Spincasting rods are easy to handle and perfect for Junior Anglers. These rods have straight handles and small line guides. Spincast tackle is the most popular. Baitcasting rods have either a pistol-grip or straight handle. The baitcast rod with its more complex reel is more difficult to control and is better suited for an experienced angler. Junior and Master A N G L E...

Texas Hill Country Streams

Many of the streams that run swiftly through the rocky, tree-shaded hills of Central Texas are fed by springs. These streams are home to many species of fish, amphibians, plants and insects, which depend on a steady flow of clean water for survival. Some of these species salamanders in particular are found only in these special spring-fed environments. Our state fish, the Guadalupe bass, is found in several streams and rivers of Central Texas. Hill Country streams provide good cover for fish...

Saltwater Tackle

Going after saltwater fish involves a little change in the strength of the equipment. The rods, reels, hooks, line and lures or baits vary just as in freshwater fishing, but they can be stronger and heavier, built to withstand larger fish and natural or artificial structures.